Social Studies

History I

History I, a year-long course, covers the history of the world from early man and civilizations through the period of colonization (A.D. 1600s).  Throughout this course, students will study the development of civilizations and key events that have shaped education, communication, and medicine.  Making the past relevant to the present, students will learn how ancient civilizations influenced and contributed to modern day practices. In addition to learning the content focused on early history, students will also explore the effects and importance of geography on human action.  Skills such as writing and comprehensive reading are extensively incorporated in this course.


History I Honors

History I, a year-long course, covers the history of the world from early man and civilizations through the period of colonization (A.D. 1600s).  Throughout this course, students will study the development of civilizations and key events that have shaped education, communication, and medicine.  Making the past relevant to the present, students will learn how ancient civilizations influenced and contributed to modern day practices. In addition to learning the content focused on early history, students will also explore the effects and importance of geography on human action.  Skills such as writing and comprehensive reading are extensively incorporated in this course. Honors students will be challenged through higher-order critical thinking projects and assignments. These students will be held to a higher grading standard as well as a higher critical writing standard.  A greater emphasis will be placed on Honors students' ability to analyze and evaluate the impact of historical events.


History II

This course is a year-long study of the colonization era through 1900 on a 10th-grade level. It will incorporate aspects of world history, with an emphasis on American history. Students will need either a comprehensive world history course (completed at a previous school) OR the TFS History I course as a prerequisite. Students will learn to enhance their higher order thinking and writing skills. Students will also practice comprehensive reading mastery and thesis, essay writing, and citation components. Multiple teaching techniques such as hands-on projects, Socratic Learning, and debating will engage students and allow them to experience alternative methods of learning.


History II Honors

This course covers a review of the colonization era through 1900 on a 10th-grade level.  Throughout this course, students will analyze the important political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in American history since the colonial era.  Topics will include the migrations to the Americas, the colonial and revolutionary periods, the Civil War, and the precursors to World War I. Students need either a comprehensive world history course (completed at a previous school) or the TFS History I course as a prerequisite. Students will learn to enhance their higher order thinking and writing through the intense use of primary source documents. Upon completion of this course, students will achieve mastery in comprehensive reading and thesis, essay writing, and citation components. Honors students will be challenged through higher-order critical thinking projects, assignments, analysis of historical impact, and a rigorous grading standard.


History III

This course, one year long, covers a review of the World War I era and continues to present-day on an 11th-grade level.  Throughout this course, students will analyze the important political, military, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in American history since World War I. Topics will include global and regional wars, the Civil Rights Movement, modern imperialism, and current global politics.  Students need either a comprehensive world history course (completed at a previous school) or the following TFS courses as prerequisites: History I and History II. Upon completion of this course, students will learn mastery of the following skills: higher order thinking and writing, comprehensive reading, thesis statements, essay writing, and proper citations.


History III Honors

This course, one year long, covers a review of the World War I era and continues to present-day on an 11th-grade level. It will incorporate aspects of world history while focusing primarily on American history and America’s relationship with the world since World War II. Students need either a comprehensive world history course (completed at a previous school) or the following TFS courses as pre-requisites: History I and History II. Honors students will be challenged through higher-order critical thinking projects and assignments. These students will be held to a higher grading standard as well as a higher critical writing standard. A greater emphasis will be placed on Honors students’ ability to analyze and evaluate the impact of historical events.


Government

Government, a semester-long course, explores the foundations, key components, and various roles of the United States government.  Learning about the operations of the U.S. government, students will also explore how citizens can participate in the government system.  While focusing on the U.S. government, the course also examines different types of government found around the world. Students will learn about the interactions between governments in past and current society.  Providing students with a deeper understanding of how government works and why individuals should care about government, this course builds upon critical thinking and lifelong learning.


Economics

Economics, a semester-long course, is structured to explain how society’s decision-making affects the economy on an individual, national, and global scale.  The course explores the relationship between the government and the economy through the use of economic concepts as a tool through which students learn better study habits and ideas to further prepare them for college.  Through this course, students will learn how our economy operates, the ways in which they participate in the American economy, as well as ways in which the U.S. economy coexists with other nations.


Economics Honors

Economics Honors is a semester-long course with the purpose of explaining how our society’s decision-making affects our economy on an individual, national, and global scale. We will also explore the relationship between our government and our economy while using economic concepts as a tool through which students learn better study habits and ideas to further prepare them for college. Through this course, students will learn how our economy operates, the ways in which they participate in the American economy, as well as ways in which the US economy coexists economically with other nations. Honors students will be challenged through higher-order critical thinking projects and assignments. These students will be held to a higher grading standard as well as a higher critical writing standard. A greater emphasis will be placed on Honors students’ ability to analyze and evaluate the impact of economic components on personal, state, national, and global levels.